WFAA has partnered with The Marshall Project, a nonprofit news organization that covers the U.S. criminal justice system, to produce No Way Out: COVID Behind Bars. It's called News Inside. Our weekly column, Life Inside, gives a voice to some of the 2.2 million incarcerated people in this country, along with others who have direct experience with the criminal justice system like cops, judges, and victims of crime. A compilation of criminal justice news from The Marshall Project News Inside September 2019 Clockwise from top left: Natalie Medley, Connie Bumgardner, Char'dae Avery, Kristina Byers-Escobedo, Rheann Kelly, and Toni Burns are students in the housing policy class at Indiana Women’s Prison. Usually there was a course textbook, but then things got more difficult. By The Marshall Project Staff News November 5 These Federal Prison Guards Are Desperate for Trump to Lose Unlike many law enforcement unions that endorsed … You will be weighing in along with incar-cerated people across the country. News August 2020—Issue 5 Inside There is so much being said about people who are incarcerated, and you don't hear enough from them. Download the PDF. The final recourse for me was scavenging reading material from the trash. Help us connect our journalism with incarcerated readers. New York Theological Seminary. (@lawbartley) Doran Larson, professor of literature and creative writing at Hamilton College. This … Lawrence Bartley Producer, News Inside A Letter from Lawrence I’M PROUD TO PRESENTthe inaugural edition of “News Inside,” created by The Marshall Project, a nonpartisan, nonprofit news organization covering the U.S. criminal justice system. The Marshall Project’s estimate is conservative and based on MTC invoices and monthly vacancy reports. As I was trying to win parole last year, a friend suggested that I submit an essay to The Marshall Project for a series called “Life Inside.” I was in the midst of five parole hearings, a verbal and emotional ordeal with years of my life on the line. Education. After being released on parole 11 months ago, Lawrence Bartley now works at the Marshall Project, a nonprofit news organization covering criminal justice issues. 15). Prisons are prime incubators for the disease, as social distancing and basic contagion protections are largely impossible behind bars. To place an order, please fill out our News Inside. The second edition of The Marshall Project's print publication explores the concept of freedom: mental, physical and spiritual. Tips on how to protect yourself from the virus within the limits of prison or jail. The Marshall Project – By Lawrence Bartley – “As I was trying to win parole last year, a friend suggested that I submit an essay to The Marshall Project for a series called “Life Inside.” I was in the midst of five parole hearings, a verbal and emotional ordeal with years of my life on the line. In the runup to the 2020 presidential election, our latest issue of News Inside explores the political opinions of incarcerated people. Over the years I watched many friends go home. I had no desire to share. Please fill out the survey on page 29. Get the latest updates on NASA missions, watch NASA TV live, and learn about our quest to reveal the unknown and benefit all humankind. That conversation led to me joining their team and to the creation of News Inside—a collection of TMP’s award-winning journalism that relates directly to incarcerated lives. By Lawrence Bartley As I was trying to win parole last year, a friend suggested that I submit an essay to The Marshall Project for a series called “Life Inside.” I was in the midst of five parole hearings, a verbal and emotional ordeal with years of my life on the line. Therefore—for me—the library wasn’t a serious option. Inside Lewisburg Prison: A Choice Between A Violent Cellmate Or Shackles. I always felt a surge of jealousy, followed by a wave of guilt, accompanied by a hope that the departing friends would not forget me. Most prisons have a library, but the selections are sparse and access can be difficult. Professors kindly got permission to bring me articles printed from the internet, but it was often hard to know what to ask for; plenty of times I didn’t know what I wanted until I saw it.